Cooling Water from Nieuwe Meer - Outfall

The ‘Zuidas’ area in Amsterdam is the beating heart of the financial service sector in the Netherlands, home to the head offices and computing centres of two major Dutch banks, ABN/AMRO and ING. That means an abundance of extremely sensitive electronic equipment that only functions optimally at certain constant temperatures. As an alternative to the energy-guzzling climate control systems of such office buildings, VBMS (as part of Visser & Smit Hanab) has constructed the first cooling pipe of the Netherlands.

Facts and figures

Float and sink pipeline
2200 m x 1200 mm PE & 1800 m x 800 mm PE pipelines
Equipment
Special inland barges and equipment
Project categories

The area’s large office parks are located along the A10 motorway, and behind it are the woods of the Amsterdamse Bos. In the middle of this small forest is Nieuwe Meer, a large lake that is 26 metres deep at its centre. The water at that depth is not much affected by heating from the sun. Capital Cooling, the inventor of the cooling pipe concept, and Nuon Warmte, which commissioned the cooling pipe for the Zuidas region, make use of this fact. The ‘cold’ water is transported into the city to help cool buildings.

Emissions reductions of up to 75%

The concept involves an open system, through which the cold water is transported at temperatures of between 8°C and 10°C from the depths of the lake to a large heat exchange unit. The cold is extracted from the water and used to cool a closed system. The unit also provides optional after-cooling, so the water in the closed system will always have a temperature of no more than 6°C. The now heated water (approx. 16°C) is transported back to the lake through a return pipe, where it is discharged at a shallow depth. The heat dissipates into the air, so the water in the lake does not heat up. Several participating buildings are connected to the closed cooling system and thus cooled. The advantage of this system compared to traditional methods, such as cooling systems or absorption cooling devices, is that it is an energy-efficient method that relies on natural temperature differences. CO2 emissions are thus reduced by up to 75%.

 

The challenge

The concept involves an open system, through which the cold water is transported at temperatures of between 8°C and 10°C from the depths of the lake to a large heat exchange unit. The cold is extracted from the water and used to cool a closed system. The unit also provides optional after-cooling, so the water in the closed system will always have a temperature of no more than 6°C. The now heated water (approx. 16°C) is transported back to the lake through a return pipe, where it is discharged at a shallow depth. The heat dissipates into the air, so the water in the lake does not heat up. Several participating buildings are connected to the closed cooling system and thus cooled. The advantage of this system compared to traditional methods, such as cooling systems or absorption cooling devices, is that it is an energy-efficient method that relies on natural temperature differences. CO2 emissions are thus reduced by up to 75%.

Project location

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